×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Former Student Gets Year In Prison For College President Election Fraud

Unknown Lamer posted about a year ago | from the of-all-the-elections-to-steal dept.

Security 274

Gunkerty Jeb writes, quoting Threatpost: "A former Cal State San Marcos student was sentenced to a year in prison this week for election tampering by using keystroke loggers to grab student credentials and then vote for himself. Matthew Weaver, 22, of Huntington Beach, Calif., stole almost 750 students' identities to try and become president of the San Diego County college's student government. His plan went awry when the school's computer technicians noticed an anomaly in activity and caught Weaver with keystroke loggers as he sat in front of the suspicious computer."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

This guy has got a bright future ahead of him (5, Funny)

Apharmd (2640859) | about a year ago | (#44308745)

in national politics. But who will get him, the Dems or the Republicans?

Re:This guy has got a bright future ahead of him (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44308831)

in national politics. But who will get him, the Dems or the Republicans?

Follow the money -- as in: who is the highest bidder?

Re:This guy has got a bright future ahead of him (5, Insightful)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year ago | (#44309183)

Diebold.

Ah, no... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308953)

If he had gotten away with it, then yes, he would have had a successful future in politics. However, he got caught. That makes him useless to all politically-interested parties.

Re:Ah, no... (-1, Redundant)

cayenne8 (626475) | about a year ago | (#44309337)

Wow...just wow.

I can understand him getting kicked out of school, but freaking federal prison for a year for just messing with a STUDENT school election?!?!

Geez, we're getting out of hand here...I've been hearing of small school children getting kicked out of school and having the cops called just for playing in the school play ground using their hands and fingers as 'guns' yelling bang bang at each other.

This is a freaking school election...not a federal / city/state election..it is college, it means NOTHING....

I can see them being punished by the school, but WTF...Federal Prison?!?!?

Re:Ah, no... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309429)

It's not that he rigged an election, it's that he stole and impersonated many students identities.

Re:Ah, no... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year ago | (#44309453)

and did it like a raving N00b. Even hackers want this idiot to go to jail

Re:Ah, no... (5, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#44309539)

I can see them being punished by the school, but WTF...Federal Prison?!?!?

No matter where he did this, he stole people's credentials (illegally), and used it to access system (illegally).

CFAA [wikipedia.org] is a federal statute, so he broke federal law -- and therefore gets federal prison.

I have no sympathy for him. None at all.

Re:This guy has got a bright future ahead of him (3, Insightful)

Rod Beauvex (832040) | about a year ago | (#44309177)

The GOP. Duh.

Dems are neither intelligent nor ballsy enough for this sort of thing.

Re:This guy has got a bright future ahead of him (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309275)

The Dems. Duh

Re:This guy has got a bright future ahead of him (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309331)

No, he hasn't. Tainting the veil of democracy by getting caught manipulating an election is a serious matter.

Re:This guy has got a bright future ahead of him (0)

interval1066 (668936) | about a year ago | (#44309483)

Serious...? Uh, this is a student election. He got this sentence because he used "hacker" tactics. Had this been simple ballot stuffing I doubt he'd have gotten such a sentence. The solution to everything in this country appears to be prison time. Unless you can afford a lawyer of course. He was probably accused ot terrist threats too.

Job Offer (5, Funny)

overlook77 (988190) | about a year ago | (#44308747)

He did receive a job offer from the NSA afterwards however.

Re:Job Offer (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308839)

Unlikely, they want the ones who don't get cought

Re:Job Offer (5, Funny)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#44308873)

The ones that cough are diseased.

Re:Job Offer (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44309431)

I'm sure that the ones that get caught do feel dis-ease.

Re:Job Offer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309095)

caught.

Re:Job Offer (1)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about a year ago | (#44309189)

They want the ones with no sense of ethics or morality.

Re:Job Offer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308853)

why would the NSA want the ones stupid enough to be caught?

Re:Job Offer (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44308889)

why would the NSA want the ones stupid enough to be caught?

Yeah, they can just hire them as contractors.

Re: Job Offer (1)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about a year ago | (#44309011)

Have you seen the news lately? You are implying an lot when suggesting they have standards.

Re:Job Offer (3, Funny)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a year ago | (#44309277)

yeah he should of set up a virtual server and had the key logger report to it then ssh'ed into it from a out of country proxy to get the credentials then cheat. oh look three black suv's pulled up and i hear a helicopter got to go.

Re:Job Offer (5, Funny)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#44308923)

I don't know why, he was sloppy. Well, I guess they could train him in the details but his heart was in the right place.

Re:Job Offer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309109)

and job offers from the DNC and RNC as well.

I think he's ready (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308757)

I think this kid's ready for the big time! Future statesman, you heard about him first on Slashdot!

Re:I think he's ready (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44308837)

I think this kid's ready for the big time! Future statesman, you heard about him first on Slashdot!

I'm not sure mentioned on slashdot is any kind of endorsement. You don't see Wil Wheaton in the DC, do you?

Re:I think he's ready (2)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#44308887)

What's wrong with Hwil Hweaton?

Re:I think he's ready (1)

SirGeek (120712) | about a year ago | (#44308901)

I think this kid's ready for the big time! Future statesman, you heard about him first on Slashdot!

I'm not sure mentioned on slashdot is any kind of endorsement. You don't see Wil Wheaton in the DC, do you?

Nope. Because Wil Wheaton :

  1. Is NOT a lawyer (and he doesn't play one on TV either)
  2. He HAS A SOUL

Re:I think he's ready (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year ago | (#44308971)

DC is not a freeway, therefore you cannot call it "the DC".

Re:I think he's ready (1)

Redmancometh (2676319) | about a year ago | (#44309085)

Stupid joke.

If you're being serious "The District of Columbia" makes more sense with the "the."

Re:I think he's ready (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year ago | (#44309227)

Then the original should say "the D.C."

Re:I think he's ready (1)

AlecC (512609) | about a year ago | (#44309289)

No, it is quite conventional to omit periods in full caps. Most people would accept "guns are common in the USA" and not require it to be "guns are common in the U.S.A." or "guns are common in USA".

Wow! (1)

jasnw (1913892) | about a year ago | (#44308763)

A year in prison for the crime of fixing a vote while not being a professional political operative. At least the kid knows he's got a shot at a good job when he gets out. Better prospects than if he had finished his program at Cal State San Marcos.

Re:Wow! (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about a year ago | (#44309021)

I'd love to see all the carefully organized evidence you have of professional political operatives engaging in vote fixing. Oh right, this is just a cynicism race-to-the-bottom, driven by paranoid conspiracy theories.

Re:Wow! (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309161)

How about the mayor in Florida that lost voting machines that were later shown to contain many more votes for the Ds than those for R. The mayor is a stanch R supporter, and when questioned how the fuck did these voting machines get lost, she replied "it happens, voting is a complex business". Yup, so complex, they were deliberately disconnected, moved to another room, and covered in a pile of boxes to disguise they were there.

That's just one example of the Bush / Fox / FL stolen election.

Re:Wow! (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a year ago | (#44309307)

or in washington two gubernatorial elections ago where the judge said yup there was evidence of cheating and dismissed the case anyway, did i mention the judge was former classmates with the "winner"

Re:Wow! (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#44309173)

Oh right, this is just a cynicism race-to-the-bottom, driven by paranoid conspiracy theories.

Sadly, I have found that both of those tend to be surprisingly accurate in the long run.

Assuming the worst of politicians (and, really, everyone else) proves right more than by simple chance. Assuming you can trust them just leads to more problems than assuming you can't and keeping a close eye on them.

simple fix (1)

Connie_Lingus (317691) | about a year ago | (#44308771)

all he needed to do was use a keystroke logger to work his keystroke logger.

Re:simple fix (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44308845)

all he needed to do was use a keystroke logger to work his keystroke logger.

I see you made a typo, then corrected it. Well done. (c:

Settings examples (5, Insightful)

GeekWithAKnife (2717871) | about a year ago | (#44308777)

He's small time, he cheated, he got caught and made an example of. If only we could have this sort of efficiency and insight into real politicians.

Re:Settings examples (5, Insightful)

Kookus (653170) | about a year ago | (#44309133)

If someone steals my credentials, I'd expect that kind of punishment. I don't think he's being made an example, he's actually getting off light.
There's a lot of other things that he could potentially do, or has exposed those students to by capturing their passwords. It's not that he was caught trying to rig an election, it's that he was impersonating other individuals, stealing their identities.

Re:Settings examples (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309301)

His actions were risky for himself and stupid. However it doesn't' warrant jail time.

This danger continue to persist regardless of his arrest. Instead of fixing the problem (educating users) about the dangers of entering private information into public computers they turn an otherwise decent person who made a mistake into a criminal who can't ever hold down a decent paying job ever again. The jail time in an of itself is nothing. What we are doing is f'd up. It ensure more criminal activity will occur because this person will never be able to succeed in any other way now (other than as a criminal).

The failure is on the educational system and those with the know-how to write secure systems and/or there bosses/employers. Microsoft and others should be held liable to such extent that security is made a top priority. Obviously the lack of security of this system may not have been the fault of Microsoft. The fault here lies with the school systems for there failure to educate users about best security practices (such as not entering private information into public systems, basic cryptography, https, and how any program which does not utilize encryption is insecure, plus the fact SSL is potentially vulnerable to government eavesdropping).
 

Re:Settings examples (1)

gr8_phk (621180) | about a year ago | (#44309487)

The jail time in an of itself is nothing. What we are doing is f'd up. It ensure more criminal activity will occur because this person will never be able to succeed in any other way now (other than as a criminal).

But he may have had political ambitions too. Nothing like a formal charge of election fraud to end a political career. Agreed that what a conviction does to a persons future is far too excessive - in fact, it should theoretically have zero effect since the jail term is allegedly the punishment.

Re:Settings examples (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | about a year ago | (#44309219)

He's small time, he cheated, he got caught and made an example of. If only we could have this sort of efficiency and insight into real politicians.

I hope you're joking. This is simply publicity that will jump start his public political career. There is no such thing as bad press anymore. Morals were thrown out the window a couple of decades ago.

When he gets out (-1, Troll)

WillyWanker (1502057) | about a year ago | (#44308781)

I'm sure he'll be a perfect candidate for a Republican governor, congressman, or even Presidential candidate. His future looks very bright indeed!

Re:When he gets out (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308859)

Sounds more like he has a future with the Democrats. Many elections more people vote for the Democrat candidate in an area than live in the area. The Democrats already work hard at rigging the elections.

fine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308937)

prove it

Re:When he gets out (0)

Jeff Flanagan (2981883) | about a year ago | (#44309033)

Not really, but many ignorant people who have been tricked by their own superstitions and insular worldview into voting Republican think so.

Re:When he gets out (1)

Cornwallis (1188489) | about a year ago | (#44308921)

I'm sure he'll be a perfect candidate for a Republican or Democrat governor, congressman, or even Presidential candidate. His future looks very bright indeed!

FTFY

Slashdot presents: The Unholy Shit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308791)

The rain was getting harder. It was now precisely 11:51 PM, and Mark was into his fifth beer. He was feeling pretty invincible but the night was young, and he intended to get wasted before it was all over. He had put in a rough week at work and he deserved it.

He lit another cigarette. He and his drinkin' buddies sat in their traditional circle, in Ian's apartment. The talk wandered from sex to work, back to sex, to basketball, finally settling on sex. Mark had eaten lunch at Taco Bell, and had drunk four cups of coffee between lunchtime and quitting. In addition, the beers were beginning to settle in. And now, at 11:51 PM, Mark had to take a shit. He stood up. "Shit break," he announced. It was customary among this group to make such an announcement.

Mark walked to the bathroom. As he locked the door behind him, thunder boomed. It was storming out there.

He pulled his pants down and sat on the toilet. Ian's bathroom was a mess. He counted five empty toilet paper rolls, two paperbacks, and yesterday's newspaper. His friends laughed about something. The lights flickered for a moment, and the pre-shit growl came from within. He could feel the product lined up inside him for disposal. Then, he began to push.

Plop. The first piece fell to the water. Then some movement, and Mark felt the main feature inside him, the mother lode. He grunted softly as he squeezed it out. It crackled past his sphincter, and splashed neatly into the bowl.

Then another one queued up, and came out. It was almost as big as its predecessor. Mark would have well-purged bowels tonight, he realized with a smirk. He heard thunder again, closer this time.

Another one? Jeez, he thought. When was my last shit? It ventured forth, Mark's muscles helping it out. It was the biggest one so far. The shit's passage through his anus, that rarest mix of pain and pleasure, was longer than any he could remember. Ahhhh...the stout log advanced with conviction. This was definitely going to be his finest creation; this was a huge one. Still grinning, he wondered if Ian had a camera.

He pushed. Peering between his legs, past his genitals, he saw that it had reached the water. This was like seeing the longest freight train ever. Damn, it was a wide one. And it was still attached! And there was more! He pushed more, harder. It kept coming. He couldn't even feel the end of this one yet; soon it was bending, folding on itself like a sundae topping. Mark stopped pushing and caught his breath. He was sweating; he realized that however long this piece of shit was, it wasn't nearly all the way out yet. He still couldn't feel the end.

He pushed, he strained, it kept coming. His intestines couldn't be that damn long, but this shit just wouldn't quit. In fact, he was feeling the diarrhoeal urgency of *having* to shit. He dutifully answered nature's call, and pushed harder. His efforts were rewarded with more shit. His sphincter was too strained to even pinch the loaf off. It was whole and complete.

He couldn't feel the end.

Fear now came to Mark. He flushed the toilet to make room for more. Even as the bowl refilled, the cramps rose up, and he pushed. Within seconds, the shit extended from his anus to bottom of the bowl. The harder he pushed, the more he had to shit. And it was getting worse. He scarcely had time to catch his breath; his face was quite red as he grunted and struggled to keep up. The shit seemed endless. He looked between his legs again, and gasped as he saw that the bowl was fully a quarter filled with his product, the water dangerously high. The tank wasn't even done filling, but he flushed again. Unfortunately, the plumbing was unable to handle the volume of feces, and the toilet backed up. Mark jumped when the cold water touched his buttocks.

It was now 11:57. Thunder roared outside as water and shit particles flowed onto the tile.

Mark's pants were bunched about his ankles, and he was in pain. The shit advanced relentlessly as he stumbled into the bathtub. He was almost panicking now, and didn't notice the trail of solid feces he had left. Gripping the tub for support, he squatted and kept pushing.

The conversation in the front room had stopped. Eddie smelled it first, and blamed a fart on Ian, but this was no fart. This was pure and concentrated; this was the smell that only the freshest shit can make. The four looked at each other, puzzled. Then they heard Mark's groaning from the bathroom.

"Mark, are you beating off again?" Doug asked. No answer.

The smell was worse. Brian sniffed deeply and gagged. "Jesus H. ...". Ian grimaced. "Goddamn...". They all went for the bathroom door at the same time. Ian jiggled the locked doorknob. Brian pounded on the door. "Dude, what the FUCK did you eat today?" No answer. Mark groaned. "You all right in there, Mark?"

They looked at each other again. Eddie sniffed and winced. There was no answer from inside. Brian knocked again. "Hey man, you OK?" No answer. A short scream came from within the bathroom.

Brian kicked the door open. Nobody spoke.

The odor was intense, feces was piled on the floor and in the bathtub. Mark was squatting next to the wall, his face impossibly red, his eyes helpless and terrified. Firm stool thrust forward from his anus like meat from a grinder. It landed in his pants bunched about his ankles, spilling over and piling up. He gritted his teeth and strained; all he could do was keep pushing. There was a sound like a ripping sheet and Mark's colon came loose from his now shapeless sphincter, oozing to the floor. His friends watched as the slimy organ descended, with shit still flowing from it. Mark screamed again, and somebody's watch beeped.

Brian got the worst of it, since he was closest to the door. He would later tell the police that he thought he had seen Mark's abdomen expand for an instant before it happened. None of the others had reported this. But they had all described the sound as a "dull thud", they had all been splattered with innards and feces as Mark's torso separated from the rest of his body.

"Massive gastrointestinal rupture/trauma secondary to indeterminate blockage" was noted in the medical examiner's report. An "unusually large amount of fecal matter" is also recorded, though the amount was not measured.

The funeral was closed-casket. Brian and Eddie seem to have recovered pretty well, though they never talk about Mark. Doug moved away, and nobody has heard from him lately. Sometimes, when he has to shit, Ian waits until the rain stops.

Re:Slashdot presents: The Unholy Shit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308863)

Dumbfuck ... talentless dumbfuck

True Story (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308807)

I did something similar at "Canada's Premiere Undergraduate Experience"

Long story short, one of the people running for Student Union President won my House election the year before. He did so by getting the competition kicked out on technicalities. No, I wasn't running, and No, I wasn't friends with anyone who did. Since every day a poster is up is a "violation" they racked up fast. This guy was going out with the person who's job it is to notify people of potential violations, and they were never warned.

Fast forward two years, and I logged in as every. single. student. from a MacDonalds down the road. Didn't actually vote, just logged in, logged right back out. Then repeated 8k times. Once a student logged in, they had an hour to finish. Since everyone's hour was up at 9AM, almost no one voted.

Somehow, there was still a landslide win. Not only did he have 90% of the votes, he had more votes than there were students in the entire university.

The whole election should have been thrown out. People complained on official forums, topics were deleted as fast as they went up.

It pays to play dirty apparently.

Re:True Story (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | about a year ago | (#44308941)

No..it pays to not get caught.

Re:True Story (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44309533)

No..it pays to not get caught.

Which, in American politics, usually translates to "pin it on some low-level minion and let them take the fall"

Re:True Story (3, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44308975)

I did something similar at "Canada's Premiere Undergraduate Experience"

Long story short, one of the people running for Student Union President won my House election the year before. He did so by getting the competition kicked out on technicalities. No, I wasn't running, and No, I wasn't friends with anyone who did. Since every day a poster is up is a "violation" they racked up fast. This guy was going out with the person who's job it is to notify people of potential violations, and they were never warned.

Fast forward two years, and I logged in as every. single. student. from a MacDonalds down the road. Didn't actually vote, just logged in, logged right back out. Then repeated 8k times. Once a student logged in, they had an hour to finish. Since everyone's hour was up at 9AM, almost no one voted.

Somehow, there was still a landslide win. Not only did he have 90% of the votes, he had more votes than there were students in the entire university.

The whole election should have been thrown out. People complained on official forums, topics were deleted as fast as they went up.

It pays to play dirty apparently.

Have to be careful when playing dirty. In my elementary school was a fellow running for class president and he was well liked and popular. One of his competitors for the honor (as there really wasn't much to the office) found he had been born outside the US (he was an Aussie by birth) and this revelation -- why it was even considered by the faculty baffled me -- meant the popular student was ineligible. It really broke his heart and seemed incredibly unfair, particularly to classmates. Keep in mind most of us were 12 or younger, but we already had a pretty well developed sense of what is fair and how you deal with weasels who succeed in removing competition by devious means, the weasel was soundly defeated in the vote. So the lesson here isn't that you cannot have your competitor diminished by technicalities or smearing, but you should always have a surrogate do it on the side so you don't get caught for the 'Swiftboating'.

Re:True Story (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309369)

In my elementary school, there was this really bright student running for class president. He was going to win by just one vote, but then the opposing candidate's famous Aunt got involved and demanded a recount. Lawyers got involved and the election seemed to drag on forever. Luckily, the opposing candidate conceded after realizing how stupid this all was. Just another day in my quiet mountain town.

Mixed feelings (2, Interesting)

istartedi (132515) | about a year ago | (#44308811)

On the one hand, fraud is bad. On the other, student government is usually a joke that deserves to be pranked. At the college level it is, AFAIK, not much better than HS. Our Class President gave a friggin' 15 minute speech at commencement. Holy Crap! That was the only real debacle at graduation. I'll never forget it. That's all I remember about the class president.

Re:Mixed feelings (5, Interesting)

91degrees (207121) | about a year ago | (#44308865)

the problem is that this job comes with a stipend. Once you actually make money from this sort of thing (even a relatively small amount), it's financial fraud and taken a lot more seriously.

Re:Mixed feelings (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309001)

School don't have money to pay teachers to teach but they have money to give to "politicians" who want a career as a liar and a cheat?

Re:Mixed feelings (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44308871)

On the one hand, fraud is bad. On the other, student government is usually a joke that deserves to be pranked. At the college level it is, AFAIK, not much better than HS. Our Class President gave a friggin' 15 minute speech at commencement. Holy Crap! That was the only real debacle at graduation. I'll never forget it. That's all I remember about the class president.

Student government is seldom more than a popularity contest.

It can be good training (relatively speaking and tongue firmly in cheek) for figuring out social engineering skills - what are the hot buttons for people, what people are likely to remember of your (ha) promises after you've been elected and practice in keeping skeletons from accumulating in your closet.

Re:Mixed feelings (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about a year ago | (#44308959)

Stealing an election at my college (back in the day) would've been a lot easier than this. I should know: I was in charge of running them one year, and I could've simply picked who I wanted to win (but I didn't).

Re:Mixed feelings (2)

DigitAl56K (805623) | about a year ago | (#44309115)

On the one hand, fraud is bad. On the other, student government is usually a joke that deserves to be pranked.

Yeah but "prank" and "stealing credentials from 750 people and then using their identities without consent" don't really go hand in hand. Bad judgement on an epic scale..

He'll always have a home... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308825)

in the GOP.

Ohio and Florida (1)

Blugenes (2987347) | about a year ago | (#44308847)

He could work for either voting board and do well!

this is why verification is needed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308851)

This is why everyone needs to be able to verify that their vote was counted the way they voted. They got lucky and caught the guy this time, but I'm sure this has been done before at larger scales by people with more resources.

...you will absorb the culture (1)

ElitistWhiner (79961) | about a year ago | (#44308867)

Choose wisely where you go to school

Not exactly the best and brightest... (1)

Yaddoshi (997885) | about a year ago | (#44308875)

When I was in college my roommate and friends successfully ran a campaign to get Gumby elected student President, highlighting how useless student government really is.

Aside from his 15 minutes of fame, I don't really see how the reward justified the risks he took, although encore proved a significant lack of common sense.

Re:Not exactly the best and brightest... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309003)

It's more or less useless to the school and student population, but it matters when you're 22 and looking for a job and you can use to support a "leadership" role.

Also, being from San Diego, this guy has a bright future ahead of him in San Diego politics, that's for sure!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randy_Cunningham
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Filner
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Hedgecock
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Diego_pension_scandal

Re:Not exactly the best and brightest... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309111)

Perhaps i should provide some reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randy_Cunningham - Congressman from North San Diego, in prison for accepting bribes from Defense contractors. The longest prison sentence in American history for a serving politician.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Filner - Current mayor, accused of numerous sexual harrassment issues, has basically admitted guilt, and refuses to resign. The lack of confidence from voters has pitted him against the city council and the city is at a standstill.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Hedgecock - Convicted of perjury and conspiracy to commit perjury when he was accused of campaign donor fraud on a second trial; the first he apparently got the bailiff to serve the jury alcohol and pressure the jury to acquittal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Diego_pension_scandal - City has consistently underfunded the pension for city employees while numerous and bogus pension claims have been racking up by city employees and their families. The pension is underfunded by $2.1 billion. THe previous CIty Attorney Mike Aguirre prolonged the problem, the current Jan Goldsmith is doing a good job at chipping away at it.

Here's another:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Zucchet - after the mayor resigned due to incompetence, he acted as Deputy Mayor until a special election could be held. Three days later he resigns under corruption and wire fraud charges from local strip clubs to repeal anti-prostitution laws.

I love San Diego.

Stooopid stooopid stoopid! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308913)

Too bad he played his ace card now, when he could have waited for US presidential (digital) election and rig that instead... even though, NSA is well placed to do that.

This kid had to be jailed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308973)

Upstart young activist punks like this with their improvised guerilla techniques run the risk of democratising vote rigging.

Plea bargaining (0)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#44308977)

Weaver, 22, of Huntington Beach was a third-year business student when he carried out the elaborate plan to win election as president of the schoolâ(TM)s student council in March 2012. He pleaded guilty this year to three federal charges, including wire fraud and unauthorized access to a computer.

Yet another American deprived of his right to a trial. No doubt they would have tried to send him to prison for a decade or more if he decided to exercise his rights.

A year in prison is probably a fair outcome if the story is as described. But he deserves to have a jury decide that, and not face absurd amounts of time in prison if he wants a jury trial.

Re:Plea bargaining (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309131)

750 students * 10 years in jail for hacking an account means he could have gotten out sometime in 2763.

Re:Plea bargaining (2)

Seranfall (680430) | about a year ago | (#44309223)

Yet another American deprived of his right to a trial. No doubt they would have tried to send him to prison for a decade or more if he decided to exercise his rights.

A year in prison is probably a fair outcome if the story is as described. But he deserves to have a jury decide that, and not face absurd amounts of time in prison if he wants a jury trial.

He chose not to fight the charges. He was not deprived of his right to a trial. He could of plead not guilty. How about maybe he felt bad about what he did and actually plead guilty because he is in fact guilty. Maybe he decided to actually take personal responsibility for his actions and acknowledge in a court of law that what he did was wrong. Since your not his lawyer all you can do is speculate on his reasons for pleading guilty.

Re:Plea bargaining (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309267)

Are you for real? Don't you read the stories on here & other places about prosecutors stacking charges in order to force the defendant to choose between:

- A chance to win in court = 0 jail time.
- A chance to lose in court = 10-20 years.
- Plea bargain = 1-2 years.

As opposed to the normal elitist view, most people are not dumber than the average bear, and _do_ have an instinctive grasp of game theory - they choose the plea, because the risk is simply too great that your defense will mess up, or the jury will dislike the cut of your suit ;-)

Re:Plea bargaining (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309397)

I think what OP means is that he was given the choice between trumped up charges at trail and getting possibly 10+ years of prison time or plead guilty and get 1 year which means you would probably hedge your bets by getting the 1 year. Also, in CA one 1 year for non violent crime means he'll probably be out as soon as the jail can accept him and release him so like 4-20 hours of "jail time" depending on how busy the jail is that day. He will be release to a probation officer who will possible call him once a month at the best. The officer is too busy keeping tabs on actually dangerous criminals to care. So faced with that or a trail I think you'd plead guilty even if you didn't do it.

Re:Plea bargaining (0)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#44309475)

He chose not to fight the charges.

What sort of choice is "exercise your rights and face decades in prison or forfeit your rights"?

Would you say the same if the goverment extorted people out of other rights? e.g. "you're not deprived of your right to bear arms. But if you choose to exercise that right we will retaliate against you"? Is that OK?

He could of plead not guilty.

In which case, he almost certainly would have been facing charges over a decade. That's extortion.

How about maybe he felt bad about what he did and actually plead guilty because he is in fact guilty. Maybe he decided to actually take personal responsibility for his actions and acknowledge in a court of law that what he did was wrong. Since your not his lawyer all you can do is speculate on his reasons for pleading guilty.

97% of federal defendents plead guilty. How credulous do you have to be to believe that the government is right 97% of the time, AND that every one of those defendents suddenly develops a conscience?

No, the only explanation for that kind of statistic is that people are being bullied out of their right to a trial.

Re:Plea bargaining (0)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about a year ago | (#44309285)

How is this informative?

He pleaded guilty

There was no trial, he plead guilty, probably part of a plea bargain. He wasn't deprived of anything. Pleading guilty avoids certain un-pleasantries.

Re:Plea bargaining (4, Interesting)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#44309335)

Pleading guilty avoids certain un-pleasantries.

That's extortion. If someone were bullied by the government out of their right to criticize the government, would you say "Not criticizing the government avoids certain un-pleasantries"?

The whole point of having rights is that the government cannot make your life more unpleasant for exercising them. Getting extra charges tacked on for exercising your right to a trial is no more just than getting extra attention from the IRS for exercising your right to criticize the government.

Re:Plea bargaining (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about a year ago | (#44309493)

By that token, everything the government does is "Extortion". Taxes included. In other words, you're opposed to this form or extortion, but probably happy about others. Or are you an Anarchist?

Re:Plea bargaining (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about a year ago | (#44309549)

"Getting extra charges tacked on for exercising your right to a trial is no more just than getting extra attention from the IRS for exercising your right to criticize the government."

Except for one little detail. One was optional, the other was not. IRS Scandal was not at the option of those being scandalized by the IRS, while this one was. He had a chance to go to trial, he chose against it.

Re:Plea bargaining (1)

MacTO (1161105) | about a year ago | (#44309295)

Yes, a year in prison is fair given the nature of his crime given that he pleaded guilty.

Yet I wouldn't agree with that being a fair sentence if he decided to "exercise his rights". Exercising your rights is appropriate when your rights are being trampled, such as when you're being prosecuted for a crime that you didn't commit, you are being charged under the wrong law, or when you're planning to challenge the constitutionality of a law. Exercising your rights because you hope to get off for a crime that you committed is an abuse of the courts and deserves to be punished more harshly.

Having a jury decide is not always a good thing (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about a year ago | (#44309467)

I'm guessing that you have never served on a jury in the USA. I have twice and it just left me completely cynical about the entire US justice system and the use of juries in general. Literally anything can happen on a jury. A lot of ugly horse trading goes on like "OK, that guy over there wants a conviction on all counts, that woman over there wants him found innocent on all counts but she admits he may be guilty on one count... can we just agree on a guilty verdict on that one count and call it a day?" As the joke goes, juries are made up of people too stupid to get out of serving. The last time I served, I sat in stunned silence in the jury room before we went into court as 3 male members of the jury got onto a contest and tried to top each other as each insisted in turn that he was far stupider about technology than the other 2 and each provided examples to support his contention. The case we heard was a criminal case involving a black defendant and what I could basically describe as property damage and we had a black guy on the jury who was a reverse racist and was very strongly prejudiced against the defendant simply because he was black. It took some smooth talking and pleading by the white foreman to get this guy to agree to our verdict of guilty on 2 counts, innocent on 1 count, as I think the black guy would literally have voted for the death penalty if he could against the defendant. These are the kinds of people in the USA who serve on juries. Do you honestly think that any sane person would roll the dice on that when maybe facing 10+ years if the jury convicts? Plus, a lot of people in juries are obsessive about punishing "evil doers" as they see them and they want the most severe punishment possible given, sometimes arguing for punishment way beyond what the crime should involve, like 10 years for stealing $5 worth of merchandise. The only thing I took away from my service as a juror is that juries are made up mostly of idiots who aren't fit to judge whether the sun will come up tomorrow or not, let alone someone's life or freedom.

Re:Having a jury decide is not always a good thing (2)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#44309541)

Do you honestly think that any sane person would roll the dice on that when maybe facing 10+ years if the jury convicts?

That's exactly why plea bargains must be abolished. Because no sane person can exercise their right to a trial anymore.

Lesson Learned (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year ago | (#44308985)

You only go to jail for election fraud when the election officials do not get paid by the elected office of which you have just stolen.

remember the mr cartmanez white people method (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308991)

if you cheat and lose you are a loser
if you cheat and win you are savvy

if there is a chance you might get caught you cheat twice as hard

this guy got caught because he made the cardinal criminal mistake of laziness, for his laziness he will have his life ruined

She said with a straight face (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44308999)

http://abcnews.go.com/US/cal-state-student-year-prison-rigging-campus-election/story?id=19682401

In a statement from the U.S. Attorney's Office, U.S. Attorney Laura Duffy said, "If privacy is to mean anything in a digital age, it has to be protected. A 12-month sentence adequately warns men and women like Weaver that they cannot hide from the consequences of their actions behind youth or privilege."

But I guess you can hide from the consequences of your actions if they are hidden behind secret rulings on secret laws by a secret court.

If only (5, Insightful)

JavaBear (9872) | about a year ago | (#44309005)

If only they would take the real elections half as seriously, maybe then we'd regain a (small) measure of confidence in the election process.

Prison (5, Interesting)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#44309023)

He's probably going to prison for accessing the students accounts, not for the election fraud itself.

Re:Prison (5, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#44309343)

He's probably going to prison for accessing the students accounts, not for the election fraud itself.

That's why you don't do this, kids. You start with logging other people's strokes and you end up stroking other people's logs.

Re:Prison (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309389)

Even then, the (ab)use was pretty damn simple at that.

A year is way too much for something so childish as vote-fraud for a silly student election even if they did access accounts of others.
6 months at the most would sort anyone out for something like that.

But then I remember, this is America, gotta throw everyone in prison, that way you can control them legally.
That kid is probably going to get wrecked in prison. Life ruined, he will turn to crime, back in to prison within 2 years, rinse and repeat.
Well done America, you created another criminal. A smart one at that. Well, smart-ish. But this alone will drive him to learn more.

Intellgence without wisdom. (1)

Red_Chaos1 (95148) | about a year ago | (#44309053)

What a waste.

A future leader of the US electorial commision (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309075)

The sheeple are allowed to choose between John Jackson (with his 2-cent tax that "goes too far") and Jack Johnson (with his 2-cent tax that "doesn't go far enough"). This is what the sheeple are taught in school that democracy means.

Lower down, and the voting system MUST be rigged so no grass-root changes start to emerge that might eventually challenge the status quo. Therefore we see the increasing use of electronic voting machines whose main property is how easily they may be tampered with in essentially untraceable ways. Because each voter is fundamentally unaware of how others vote, those in charge of the voting system can trivially create the outcome they desire.

Actually, there is a way to notice when vote-rigging occurs- by observing discrepancies between high quality sample polling of the voting population days before the election and the actual election result itself. However, polling organisations are now entirely bent (dishonest, crooked) in every nation they are found. The public never gets an independent, statistically correct sample poll (although such polls are constantly created in secret to monitor the likely voting patterns of the sheeple).

In the UK, USA, Canada, Germany, Australia, France and many other nations, whoever seems to be elected to run the country continues and accelerates the same policies as their seeming political opponents that previously had control. For instance, whether Americans vote the second Clinton or the third Bush for president next time, America will continue and accelerate its war mongering across the planet, and will continue and accelerate the police state at home.

Matthew Weaver is 'fried gold' for those that really control the USA. His attitude and mindset could not be more perfect. Amoral, win at all costs and identify the easily exploited weakness in the system.

Sayre's Law (3)

benjfowler (239527) | about a year ago | (#44309083)

"The reason academic politics are so bitter is that so little is at stake." -- Henry Kissinger

Lesson: use multiple computers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309103)

Why did he think 750 people logging in from the same computer wouldn't be noticed?

That makes no sense... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309139)

The last couple of guys who did the election fraud thing... Got to be president.

And this one goes to jail?

Talk about double standards...

I guess his mistake was he was smalltime.. You have to go HUGE if you're going into crime. Then you're too big to fail!

Re:That makes no sense... (1)

Seranfall (680430) | about a year ago | (#44309245)

The last couple of guys who did the election fraud thing... Got to be president.

And this one goes to jail?

Talk about double standards...

I guess his mistake was he was smalltime.. You have to go HUGE if you're going into crime. Then you're too big to fail!

Where is your proof of that claim that there was election fraud in the last presidential election? Once again some AC spouting crap with nothing to back it up. Let me guess, you read it on Facebook so it must be true.

I hope he learned a valuable lesson... (1)

neo-mkrey (948389) | about a year ago | (#44309151)

that is to bribe the IT people first to look the other way.

No counter-intelligence (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44309169)

Never underestimate the power of an IT nerd

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?